Flogging A Dead Horse.

“If you are on social media, and you are not learning, not laughing, not being inspired or not networking, then it’s time to go”.

Facebook in relation to the Dobermann didn’t work well for me the first time and after given it a second change the quality was even worse. It was a learning curve to be socially active within a broad field of interest. I had to experience that the same ‘healthy discussions’ and topics would repeath themselfs after some period of time. I almost would say it is all fake how can you waste so much time and energy. The Dobermann needs more than ever before a serious and marture community for their future well being .

Maybe my social skills are not very well developed (blame it on genes and nurture) but that would to easy. Facebook itself and his users are not on that platform to preserve the Dobermann Breed that is my feeling and so far my own experience after several years of being a member of it.

Let us hope that I’m so wrong and that soon there will be the kickoff of a worldwide population management plan. A platform with serious cooperation, lectures, podcast, seminars and everything what is necessary to serve the breed for better.

Feel free to share with me dear Dobermann Friends if that becomes a reality  !

 

Laundary
I’m still around for quality conversations or interesting future prospects. There is communication possible also after Facebook…….
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The Story of Derek

Head portrait from Derek (2)
Derek was assigned with his handler by one of the Combat War Dog Platoons. He was one of the 1047 Army Dogs 

Sharing stories about the breed, their history and the individual dog in it is worthful. As there is the story of Derek. Derek a Dobermann boy born on june 5th 1942. He lived with Frank and Priscilla Dunn, his owners, in Massachusetts. Probably he was a normal family dog with not a real ‘job’ than being a companion and maybe a protector. It would not take long before his comfert life changed and ,speaking about a job, he would serve his country what would be appreciated and described as honorable.

Frank Dunn was sent overseas with the Army during World War II and his wife Priscilla moved to New York City, Derek was loaned to the Marine Corps to become a war dog. Frank enroll Derek in november 27th 1943. With the notification that if he would not adapted to military training or his services would not be requered anymore, the desire was that he would return to his family. He was accepted as a service dogs with “The DevilDogs’ on 29th januari 1944. Not even become two years, not fully mature and he would probably have to deal with the hardest of times.

Letter from War Dog Training, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. 3, August 1944.

Camp Le Jeune
In the War Dog Training School both men and dogs would be trained for combat. There were to be three basic functions for the dogs. You has Scout dogs, Messenger dogs and Mine dogs. Derek would become a Messenger Dog.

 

The letter to Mrs. Frank Dunn mentioned , to quote, I am glad to be able to tell you that Derek #260 proved to be a very good dog in training. He was trained as a messenger dog and was transferred overseas with his two Marine handlers several momths ago, leaving here in fine shape. His team was assigned to one of the Combat War Dogs Platoons overseas as replacement. Signed by Jackson H. Boyd, Captain, USMCR, Commanding.

Approx the end of August 1945 was the start of the detraining programm for all Marine War Dogs so that they may be suitable for return to civilian life. When the dogs were considered to be temperamentally and physically rehabilitated for return to civilian life, the Head Trainer and the Chief Veterinarian will be submit a joint report on the temperamental and physical condition of each dog to the Commanding Officer in writing, with recommondations for final disposition, for transmittal to higher authority.

Below is a other letter were is mentioned that Derek will be returned for detraining to Camp Lejeune.

Document, 1
Derek served with the 1st Marine Division as a messenger until he was discharged in 1945. During his service, he was wounded twice.

 

Discharge Certificate

Derek received at februari 5th, 1946 a Honarable Discharge, it mentioned he had a excellent character.

 

Derek and George Baker

Derek Dunn and George Baker march in a parade during the National Convention for the Marine Corps League in Atlantic City, 1951. George was Derk’s handler during the time he served, look at them both being so proud.

 

Derek died in 1952 and received a burial with full military honors at Hillside Acre in Methuen, Massachusetts.

I have try to find more information and came across a YouTube video from the Pet Memorial Cemetry. I like to share it with you and hoped to notice Derek in it but sadly I could not trace him. Still it’s a very worthful share.

 

 

With respect I dedicate this little share at all Dogs but especially to Derek who served and have been so loyal. Loyal to their handlers who they get mostly a special bond with. I’m not a supporter of dogs going into wars or conflict areas. There is also a other side of the coin. That said it’s also the history of the breed Dobermann and is for me the reason to share and remember. 

They served us let us now be there for them and their future well being.

 

reference:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/usmcarchives/

If you click at the photo you will notice Derek’s file.

Derek Dunn Postcard, 1952

 

dobermann981601186.wordpress.com/2018/08/05/marine-war-dogs-of-ww-ii/

 

 

 

 

 

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A journey of the Dobermann

 

The journey started with a suitcase full with valuable attributes, it could hardly be closed  !

Looking back historically, the journey was hard and has taken a heavy toll.

The Dobermann is left with a empthy suitcase and without contents further traveling is impossible.

Commitment and loyalness is what keeping him close to his suitcase.

The suitcase has become a friend and friends will be protected till the end, empthy or not.

 

Fall/Dobermann/1940
It’s the journey that teaches us a lot about our destination. But have we the intellect to learn ?

 

 

 

 

 

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Let there be intellect……

 

-Frank H. Grover – writes in his article An Exploration of “A Dog with A Human Mind”

In the Beginning, Let there be mind….The Doberman was not spawn from beauty, but from an almost unimaginable intelligence that preceded them in fame.

“the earliest attempt to describe the Dobermannpinscher was Otto Goeller who described the breed as … A dog with a human mind”.

Wherever they went, their deep devotion and minds seemed to establish them as special dogs, truly as Goeller had dubbed them, “the dog with the human mind.

Above lines are just some examples of what is been written about the Dobermann and it’s mind.

The breed is also been called the Einstein among the other breeds. It’s been appreciated from the beginning of wording for his intelligence. Without intelligence I would say they are handicapped. To function as a personal protector, what should be a prior within any breeding plan, can only be expresse if the Dobermann has within it’s equipment a high level of intellect. Their sensitivity is a positive trait, they can be so one with their owners !

 

100 jaar KNPV
A portrait from the book 100 year KNPV. The KNPV wants working dogs not the show dogs. They have seen it happen that as soon as the breeders only look after the exterior of the dog the good characters will fade away. To get rid of the working abilities is no problem, to get them back almost impossible!! 

 

Intelligence………

Intelligence by itself is a complex trait but I’ll do believe that it has a inherited component ! Environment plays as with everything also a important role but there must be a foundation of intelligence to develop it further. Maturity, experience and training have a influence of the level and the different elements (as emotional intelligence) of the intelligence and character of your Dobermann. Intelligence is a must within every breed or individual dog but if we stick with the purebreds with their specific traits/skills it must be implemented into the foundation. I have reading some articles about Pointers and came across about the importance of intelligence as one of the most priors within a breeding goal or plan. If it’s pointing for Pointers, retrieve for Labradors or protection for the Dobermann all these instincts can only function, in the setting we prefer and what suits the breed structure, if there is intellect. Like to quote some lines and I will share the links of the full articles at the end of the blog.

From The American Field Magazine 1991, what is the oldest (1874) published sporting dog journal in the United States. On Breeding Bird Dogs by Robert. G. Wehle ( Bob). In selecting breeding stock and setting up your standard, the primary prerequisite of any good strain of dogs is intelligence. There is no substitute for intelligence. Earl Crangle (author of the book Pointing Dogs: Their Training and Handling) has been so successful in the major circuit with his dogs. He always felt that if he just had a top-notch shooting dog that had the great intelligence, he could make any kind of dog from there on, which he did several times. Beyond intelligence are all the natural attributes that our breed has inherited over the years__ the great instincts to point and back, the tenacity and the great hunting qualities. As well etsablished as these inherent qualities are, it’s necessary to constantly keep reinforcing them with careful selective breeding. Even intelligence can be bred out of a dog, as had been demonstrated by the breeding of show dogs today where they have given so much consideration to appearance and conformation and neglected the dog’s intelligence. End Quote. I could not describe it better and it is sadly so recognizable in regard of the Dobermann and it’s authentic traits and purpose of wording.

delyvdbarenburg_and_mc_indiana
 The Dobermann is at it’s best if he/she is with his owner/family. Everywhere and at anytime. It is a pack instinct and it’s pack are we his human companions. Through thick and thin !

 

A other quote from The Pointing Dog Journal  (1993) with as title Standing Alone, Wehle & The Elhew Pointers. Bob Wehle’s (Kennel Elhew Pointers) goal has always been to breed  “complete”  bird dogs, dogs that, given the proper training and environment, can be developed into horseback field trail performers, high-class foot hunting companions, or both. When he plans a mating, it is not with the thought of producing a specific type of dog, for example, a “grouse dog” or “guail dog”. It is with the thought of producing dogs that posses the instinct, desire, physical, wherewithal and, above all, the intelligence whatever the owner wants”. My friend Earl Crangle always said that if you start with a highly intelligent dog, you can put any kind of pattern you want on it, “Wehle notes “I believe that’s true. Intelligent dogs also have the ability to adapt to different kinds of  cover. They’ll cast to distant objectives or quater closely, depending on the conditions”. End quote.

Let us bring above lines back to the breed Dobermann and we have some fundamental points for a healthy discussion. The lack of working ability, intelligence, natural protective instinct, strong nervs, courage, true aggressive behavior, prey drive and offensive drive to name some elements. All these elements and probably more are necessary for a working (protection) dog as the Dobermann is. One element can not do without the other and that is what selection is all about. Selection for only conformation has never suit any dog and for sure not a working breed. It’s a quarantee for a breed to go down hill, what is lost is lost. Breeding some caractures with a pedigree what wears the name of the Dobermann at it, can not be taken serious. With interest and fascination I follow the future progress  of this breed in the 21th century. It will cost discipline, commitment, money, cooperation and a long term breeding (genetic)  management plan to preserve the Dobermann and it’s purpose of wording and the implementation of it. I have my doubts in a fair and constructive future prospect with respect for health, history and authenticity.

 

1920Dobie
The element I personal would prefer and think is necessary for a personal protector, as a first breed standard, is the ability to think and act rational ( sensible ). Problem solving (ability) and to deal with new situations would I describe as a form of intelligence. I’ll do believe that Canines have still a basic instinctual protective skill, there is a great difference in level. This natural mechanism is beneficial for surving.

 

Let there be protective instinct…….

The Dobermann as we can read through history is a created breed just for Herr. Dobermann’s personal needs. It’s main goal was to create a dog with natural qualities for protection. The vermin killer instinct was a trait what came with it (through example the Pinscherhunde) because of the heritage and influence from the breeds, crosses and mongrels he used in his foundation stock. I’m curious if they also had a natural instinct for the bad guy ? Through a variety of books and the many articles I have read that Dobermann’sche Hunde were in the beginning in general vicious, fearless, sharp and very aggressive. The Swiss breeder, Gottfried Liechti, who wrote in 1920 ‘They were certainly robust, had absolutely no trace of fear—not of the devil himself—and it required a good deal of courage to own one.’”  Viciousness would for me not a trait to prefer or preserve in any dog, it’s a unpredictable trait. Reliability is on the other hand a trait what is to prefer and to preserve, I’ll do hope Herr. Dobermann had the same thought. I understand that the early breeding generations were very beneficial for the needs from Herr. Dobermann and with him many others . I’ll do not think they had all the ability to function pure only on natural protection instinct. We can not ask and we were not there so everything is from hearsay in relation about the breeds behavior, it’s skill and with this how they act and react to different stimuli.

By Nature a Protector………

History book about the Dobermann
Philipp Grünig a very active man within the Dobermann breed from 1902 till the end of his life in 1955. He was a judge, author, breeder, from his kennel v. Adalheim, board member from the DV in Hesen and a eager student of the breed.

 

,,Die Geschichte der Dobermannzucht und die Entwickelung der Rasse”, by author Philipp Grünig. This great work was first published I believe in 1932. Sadly I don’t have a copy of it so I can not check if the English translation what is published some years later is fully accurate. For studying and rereading I use the online English book what is available for free. Why I mention the translation part because I was triggerd after reading the article The Dobermann Scribe written by Jens Kollenberg ( former Nordenstamm Dobermann breeder) it mentioned about something about the translation. So this could mean that some parts from the original German version is been left out and maybe some parts are not correct translated. It is also possible that some parts are new published in to the English version. Interesting and what would be te reason for this ? I have shared some of my questions with the author. My corresponding is recieved and through a reply I recieved back I hope the know more in the future.  If it will be relevant for these days that is a other question.

Quote from Grüning’s book the English online version, The Dobermann Pinscher- History and Development of the Breed.

The Dobermann is by nature a protector, guardian and companion. If kept in a home and in intimate touch with people he will not require any special training to display his watchful, willing, obedient and brave character. If the dog and his descendants are withdrawn from this environment they show a tendecy to the raginess and slenderness of the Greyhound. Their overflowing power then finds a outlet in viciousness and restlessness, especially in large cities and their intelligence seems to diminish in the same ratio. Fortunately their pristine virtues are only dormant and when restored to their natural environment their original form and character are received in their descendants.

Above quote I have shared many times but so far I didn’t get a satisfying answer or reply on it. For me it is fascinating to know what he exactly ment. And if it is possible to breed for such instinct and how does it pass in lines and how will it be expressed. The second part is even more fascinating and I translate it that the Dobermann settle best in a calm, safe and trustful relationship with his owner or family. Then he will be a sound natural protector. That said if he is far from his safe haven place or with unfamiliar people he will express a more and unpredictable restless behavior. Just my thoughts……….feel free to share yours.

Phillip_Grunig
Would loved to share my questions with Herr. Grünig.  So many related issues to above quote what would give some great and educative conversation. And maybe more understanding about the breeds spirit. What should be natural there and what is been lost through decades.

 

Yes, I believe in it……….

I’m a believer in the natural protective instincts in Canines, I believe and have experience that a dog can protect you or your property just through instinct and not through protection sport or training. It’s a survival trait and how it will expose has also to do how the bond is between your dog and you as his or her companion. Trust and respect your dogs language ! If he or she shows you through some signs ( vocal or not ) that a situation or a person is not safe or have bad intentions, trust their instinct.

No, I believe not……….

That because of it’s persona the Dobermann will be a natural personal protector. I also believe not that through IPO/Schutzhund ( routine program), KNPV or a special Protection Training  Program (exclusive suited for the Dobermann ) this can be achive. It’s there or it’s not and it will be express if there is a realistic threat………maybe you will never know and that is positive because it means you and your Dobermann didn’t have to go through such a experience. 

To many times I read in articles, breed describtion/standard or on breeders websites words as, the instinct of the Dobermann is superior in protection. In a well bred, well raised Dobermann, the instinct “should” be there. It’s not a guarantee that all Dobermans will be protective though…….or the ultimate personal protector is the Dobermann.

 

 

What I have noticed that if you study some of these breeders breeding program and used lines, it not correspond with what they carry out or wants you to make believe. There must be a package of attributes/traits in a individual dog will it can function as the standard decribed for a working dog. We know what breeding for conformation and appearance has brought us. It suits never any purebred breed to claim or preach that abilities or skills are all there by nature. If you can notice and check through study pedigrees, lines and work ability that it’s bred out.

I want to make clear that this topic is about the natural skills, intellect and instinct related to the personal protective behavior ( without any training) within the breed. In matter of the value through working sports, training and mental testing ( MH-test) for the breed, breeding plans and it’s future, is distinct from it. That is for me a other topic because for example through some routine training at a field it is possible to experience a whole other dog then outside of it. It needs a broader explanation about what must be include, all the important instincts , drives and standard trained behavior to describe what I mean. But I’ll do believe many will understand the essence of my words if not don’t hesitate to ask.

A wolfdog with protective behavior…………..

 

SCANNEN0001 - kopie
My former wolfdog boy Taiga, he reached the age of 16 years. I have learned through living with a more natural dog to read proper and uncomplicated Canine language. Let me say he had enough intellect for two !

My personal experience in the matter of natural protective behavior was with my former Saarloos Wolfdog boy Taiga. It’s my believe that what he showed that it was a protective skill. It felt for sure for the person who experience this, she was a friend and so also familiar for Taiga. It didn’t matter for him in a certain situation.

My friend would came for a visit so I unlocked the garden door. At the time she arrived I was upstairs in the house and Taiga and my Boxer Jarko could walk in and out the house and garden. After several soft callings of her I noticed that she was in the garden and by my and her surprise Taiga stood with his two front paws at her shoulders and growling soft but deep into her face. She didn’t move because she felt his tension and was for sure he would bite her if she would move forwards. I arrived in the garden and Taiga was in a second into his normal wolfdog self. He behave just normal also to her, if nothing happend. We talked about what this boy had teach us in regard of their breed describtion. If you are familiar with a Saarloos Wolfdog you will know what this boy expressed was very rare. It was within his line not common to express in this way……it was and is not common in the breed as a whole. They are far from guard or protection dogs. 

Our Canines can surpise us, positive/negative, they are all unique.

 

 

Reference :

http://www.superiorpointers.com/pdf/Standing_Alone.pdf

http://www.superiorpointers.com/pdf/Wehle_on_breeding.pdf?fbclid=IwAR3zU6HM72NDVzIfWgX9Ool1DL06SRlyMN0ocIl6ibz3BuiUKX6PHxaX0XA

http://www.adpef.org/doberman_mind/a_dog_with_a_human_mind

https://nordenstamm.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/d_jens_frank_debate-1.pdf

https://leerburg.com/knpvbob1.htm

http://time.com/4775436/how-smart-is-a-dog-really/

 

 

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The Hunter in the Dobermann

As Hunter (2)
The Dobermann as Pheasant Finder.

 

Hunting is a normal Canine behavior and it’s a basic instinctual trait. The same can be said about for example guarding, protection and companionship. The book, The First Domestication: How Wolves and Humans Coevolved by Raymond and Brandy R. Frogg, is a very good read in this matter. It explains also, at the first place, the succes of the bonding and coevolution between our species and wolves. These were the steps in the process of How The Dog Became The Dog ( title of  also Mark Derr’s book ) This unique partnership, what we can experience for ages, with the Canine species is developed through cooperation and not what many times is been suggested through fear or conflict situation ( garner the same food ). All those natural instincts were so beneficial for us to live the way we do with our Canines. Through selection we have created gorgious and outstanding breeds who could suit almost everyones needs and preference. This said it has also a very negative side in regard of genetic health, longevity, intelligence, mental well-being etc. Uniformity is not always soul-saving and breeding only for one or two specific traits can become a downfall for a breed.

Your Canine is a hunter from nature ( genetic ), I never ever met a dog with no hunting traits in it’s make up. It’s a survival skill as with many other natural traits we can experience in our individual dogs. Learning your dog how to hunt is impossible, there must be a disposition for it (it’s instinct ). Were we as humans in escalade is for example in training, strenghten traits/skills, managing the different hunting techniques and select for them ( generation after generation). I don’t have to sum up the different breeds who are labeled in the Sport/Hunting Groups, they share in a certain amount and level a differences in abilities (pointing, retrieve, prey drive). In regard to our breed the Dobermann some instinctive traits (guardian, prey drive) were very beneficial for Herr. Dobermann needs. We know were his foundation stock mostly exist from or was used for developing. These breeds, crosses and mongrels had the natural traits and were appreciate for it. Their grow was remarkable…….the rest is history. The labeled name of Personal Protector (persona) so far I’m able to study the breed, was not used in the time during Herr. Dobermann’s life and breeding years. But please do confirm me if you have papers what assumes my thought as incorrect.  I also don’t find any lines in articles were it is mentioned that Herr. Dobermann or his two friends were involved in training for man/bite work. It seems that all these training elements more or less introduced after the realisation of the breed suitability test, Schutzhund,  for the German Shepherds in 1900. It was then not a reccomodation as breeding tool. Our past human ancestors used there common sense and were very practical and realistic in the way they kept dogs and bred with them. Maybe we can learn something from them, a more down to earth approach. But I guess we have make it all so complex that these days we can not do without using science as one of the many breeding tools. 

What also is interesting to be aware of is the fact that ‘personal protection’ at itself is not a heritable trait ! Would have been nice if there was gene for it. A topic about the personal protector in the Dobermann is a interesting one. What does it need to become one, how must the indiviual act, how does it work in every day life situations etc.

To come back to the hunter in the Dobermann, many of us are familiar with their vermin killer instinct and the fact they mostly don’t prefer cats. The variety of abilities in our breed is also nothing new and many of us recognize the hunting skills in the breed and use their intrinsic motivation in daily life for a activity/sport. As they are Barn Hunting (not in the Netherlands), Lure Coursing or Hunting Dog Training. If you read your Dobermann language you will notice during maturity what he or she prefers to do for a job or as a activity what suits their mental and physical well-being. Variation is mostly what they prefer and if they equiped with intelligence you will notice it very quickly ! 

 

The Story of Ilse a female Dobermann as a Pheasant Finder.

Published in Outdoor Life from 2006 by Larry Mueller.

Although he’s a hunter, Augustyniak decided on Dobermans because he loves their personalities. Ilse was his fourth and the only one that exhibited the early intelligence and cooperation of a superdog. Seeing this, he began training her immediately. Augustyniak showed her his wallet, hid it in the house, and told her to find it. She did. He switched to hiding and dragging a pheasant wing. Later, the wing was hidden or dragged outside.

By November, Ilse had been introduced to the gun, and she thoroughly understood the odor of a pheasant wing. It wasn’t necessary to teach her quartering. Augustyniak had taught “come” by saying the command and simultaneously pulling his hand toward himself. Dogs learn physical signals most easily, so Augustyniak could whistle softly for attention and wave her in if she ranged beyond 30 yards. If in doubt about her distance, she’d look back for his opinion. On her own, she learned to hunt into or across the wind to discover bird scent quickly.

“Other hunters looked at me like I was crazy for bringing a Doberman, but that ended when she’d mop up pheasants behind their dogs,” Augustyniak said. “She’d hear a shot and watch, and if the pheasant flew on, that’s where she’d find the next one. Their dogs would be searching a hundred yards ahead. I remember one runner that she trailed for a hundred yards and still flushed within gun range. I really didn’t try to perfect her hunting style. She was more productive doing whatever worked for her. Ilse would retrieve rabbits to hand. With pheasants, she insisted on pinning them to the ground with her mouth or a paw, but I never lost a bird I hit.”

Read the full story, https://www.outdoorlife.com/pheasant-finder.

Pheasant, 1
A article in the Country Life America from April 1916 described also the Hunting abilities from the Dobermann. As that from a six month old Dobermann retrieves game, trails rabbits and is death to vermin. Or the story that others have been used the breed succesfully on foxes and coons. It also mentioned these dogs are natural watch-dogs and some of the puppies are being trained for hunting, especially for bear.

 

Hunting techniques.


I will share two examples (at the end ), a personal experience and one  from a German friend. Let me share with you that I don’t have proof of those two examples fall within the concept of natural hunting technique (instinct). Personaly I think it is, I have shared my own story in the past with the former breeder of my male as well with some other people who had also a Dobermann or were involved in dogs in different fields. Also the story of my German friend I have shared many times and both stories were never been taken seriously!  This doesn’t mean they have not a value also not in relation to instinct or Canine language and how to translate it proper. If you ask me it could be also a lack of knowledge (from the others) about dogs and behavior (instinct) in general and as possibility of heritage of our breed ancestors. I can tell that I was very pleased to read some stories what confirmed me. Let I share them first.

From the book Cynographia Brittanica, published in 1800: “The Terrier is querulous, fretful and irascible, high-spirited and alert when brought into action; if he has not unsubdued perseverance like the Bull-dog, he has rapidity of attack, managed with art, and sustained with spirit; it is not what he will bear, but what he will inflict: his action protects himself, and his bite carries death to his opponent: he dashes into the hole of the fox, drives him from its recesses, or tears him to pieces in his strong hold; and he forces the reluctant stubborn badger into light. As his courage is great, so is his genius extensive: he will trace with the Fox-hound, hunt with the Beagle, find for the Greyhound, or beat with the Spaniel. Of wild cats, martens, polecats, weasels, and rats, he is the vigilant and determined enemy: he drives the otter from the rocky clefts on the banks of rivers, nor declines the combat in a new element.”

Hunting technique
A special technique to catch some prey (mouse). If the Dobermann is close enough by it you can read it from it’s tail. Although if  her or she has a long tail. The tail plays a huge role also in relation to hunting techniques. I recognize ( the wagging from the tail ) it from my own female if she is with her nose in a mouse hole and smells that the mouse is close by.

 

In his 2008 novel Wolf Totem (by author Jiang Rong ) he write the line………….it’s about driving a herd of gazelles into the water.
This is a instinctive skill from wolves although so far my opinion is.
Mark Derr shared about the line from Wolf Totem, in relation to coexistence between wolves and American Indian people, the following line.
Whether they developed those tactics on their own
and then taught them to humans or they observe, no one can say definitively.

A other line about hunting technique.
In Mark Derr’s book A Dog’s History of America, this line got my
personal attention.
In his 1878 book, In the Wilderness, Charles Dudley Warner graphically described a dog separating a doe from the her fawn and driving her into a lake where hunters in a boat overhauled her when she was exhausted and panic-stricken and slit her throat, leaving the fawn orphaned.

The following is my own experience: It’s about my second Dobermann many years ago he was a intact youngster, at that moment around 7-8 months. I desctibe it always if he herd some dogs into the water. He did this with a purpose and determination, you could see this by reading his language. It was not learned behavior but a natural technique/skill.
I lived near the water from the Rhine and you could make very nice walks through the sand and the dogs could be in the water to play. What my former boy showed had nothing to do with playing and I only have to watch the other dog ( panic in it’s eyes ) for confirmation. You will understand that I firts was a little flabbergasted but act in a responsible way for all parties. I thought it was a incident but after the second time he would try this again with a other dog I knew it wasn’t. My feeling later was that he saw also some dogs as a prey, react and act in a aggressive and determined way and lead them into the water. The reason for this we can only guess…….

A Story from a German friend: Almost 7 years ago when I owned my first Dobermann I came across a man who had also owned several Dobermann in the past. Cat’s and a Dobermann are not a good match although most of the time. He shared a story about one of his Dobermann that had killed a cat by hunting him and hold him under water.

I’m very curious and fascinated what these two stories tell us about behavior traits. And if instinct plays a main role or there is a other underying issue. Feel free to share thoughts.

Everyday is a learning curve..……

 

 

Reference and interesting reads.

http://www.adpef.org/doberman_mind/dog_with_human_brain

https://www.outdoorlife.com/pheasant-finder

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/dogs-best-friend/201803/the-enduring-friendship-wolves-and-humans

http://www.superiorpointers.com/pdf/Wehle_on_breeding.pdf?fbclid=IwAR3zU6HM72NDVzIfWgX9Ool1DL06SRlyMN0ocIl6ibz3BuiUKX6PHxaX0XA

 

 

 

 

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Dobermann’sche Hunde aus Apolda……..

 

Apolda a small town in Thüringia, it’s where the story and birth of the Dobermannpinscher begins.                    

                         A small town what has become a big name.

 

Apolda-Marktplatz-um-1911-548x340
In 1863 was the first presentation of Dobermann’sche Hunde at the Apolda Dog Market. Must have be quite event and we know now that it was the beginning of a growing population.

 

I have had the privilege that a Dutch Facebook Friend has offered me to borrow some of his books from his collection about the breed. I was very pleased and accepted this nice gesture. One of the books inspired me to write this blog.  It is the Chronik 100 Jahre Dobermann-Verein e.V. 1899-1999. Besides the gorgious footage, what we these days would describe as nostalgic portraits, it’s also a summing up full with interesting matters in relation to the individual dogs and also a more broader information related to the Dobermannpinscher. What so good to notice is through this book is the variety of types and you can see the start of appearance changes around 1920 and this continued still these days in 21th century.

 

Pinscher Hund
In 1838, Theodor Götz, describes the Pinscherhund as “a breed that came from England to us”. He describes them as being of various sizes, most about 1-1/4 feet tall, The are all black with light brown markings on the head, feet, chest, and extremities, with a spirited temperament and good for the extermination of rats. 

 

The name Dobermann’sche Hunde was often been used towards the type of dogs who were sharp and had these specific traits that Herr. Dobermann prefer and bred for. In and around the small town of Apolda you could come across them, they become very common. You could say famous as at the other hand notorious because of their sharpness. The name Dobermann’sche Hunde by itself is proper to use for these ‘Pinscher’ type of dogs. The name Thüringian breed was also how people would call them. I have the opinion that it is not misplaced to call them Dobermann’sche Hunde or Dobermann’s Dogs even these days. It’s the variety in type and temperament (drives, thresholds, intelligence etc.) what has given me this thought. I have noticed and learned by studying many books and through personal experience about the variety in the breed, that this is mine personal feeling. It’s the variety of the breeds, crosses and probably some mutts what is been showed through older portraits, it’s not a general uniform breed. Still in 2019 we can see a diversity from types, if it’s conformation, in drives/skills and overall temperament. The breed Dobermann stand not by itself in this matter. Herr. Dobermann choise his breeding dogs just with the goal that it must suit his needs and be functional, looks were not important. He was not a breeder with a eye for the total Dobermann, it was probably never his attention that his founding stock would become a purebred breed. Although the foundation stock is very diluted these days, genes can give us suprises. It isn’t rare that so now and then we can notice in a individual Dobermann or maybe in some strains some old fashion ( old type Dobermann ) traits in looks and even in abilities/instinct/skills etc. I will give one example, the white markings/spots on chest or paws. Nice to mention is that in the early standard these spots were allowed ( described in Simon Rietveld’s book ). I believe genetic disposition, is the word what used for this, is not only expressed visual but also through skills and abilities, so through drives and temperament. Further in this blog I will go deeper into this interesting topic of genetic disposition in the Dobermann.

I’m fascinated by history and try to study as close is possible different sources or a guideline what gives me more insight about the Dobermann. Or just more understanding from behavior and skills from my own Dobermann. I have wrote it also in a former blog that we all can experience some different traits in our Dobermann, it’s the influence from heritage. Breeding for a complete Dobermann is rare, this needs knowledge, consequence and discipline from the breeder. Conformation or specific traits they both have my interest and I’m passionate looking for new information or confirmation on the internet and in books. The influence through heritage of the founding breeds/dogs are a starting point. About the breeds foundation is still not everything clear but we have more or less a accurate list of breeds. Breeds what contribute into the wording of the Dobermann. This blog is dedicated to the important and for me still recognizable influence from the Terrier (terra- belonging to the earth). With Terrier I mean also the German Pinscher ( because of  terrier influence ) and of course the Manchester Terrier (this breed and a cross of it is been used several times ).

English Terrier

The quest to find more information about the heritage from the German Pinscher is not a easy road and debatable. There are questionmarks also about the Country of origin. England is been named in many articles as the foundation Country of the German Pinscher. The old type Black and Tan Terrier ( Englischer Pinscher ) , smooth coated pinscher, is also named by for example Jean Bungartz , as a foundation or influence of the German Pinscher’s origin. This said Bungartz described also that the German Pinscher is long enough been bred in Germany and with the registration it is justified to say that it is a German Breed. In 1895, Josef Berta founded the Pinscher Klub, which would later become the Pinscher Schnauzer Klub (PSK). In this time period the Schnauzer ( rough coated pinscher ) and the German Pinscher ( smooth coated pinscher ) were still the same breed. The only thing what seperate them was their appereance (  exterior ).

1895_Jean_Bungartz
Jean Bungartz (6 May 1854 – 15 September 1934) was a German animal painter, photographer, author and book illustrator.
Bungartz founded the Hamburger Verein zur Förderung reiner Hunderassen, the Hamburg society for the promotion of pure-bred dogs, in the 1880s.[1] In 1893 he founded the Deutschen Verein für Sanitätshunde, the German association for Red Cross dogs, and led it until 1909.

In 1933 the German Pinscher is been recognized by the German Dobermann Club as the main ancestor of the Dobermann. Even before Herr. Dobermann started to breed his own breeding creation there were Pinscher type of dogs in Apolda and surroundings. It is also good to be aware of the fact that in Germany approximate 1800-1900, probably earlier, that there were two varietes. They both belong to the same breed ( a s I describe it earlier ), “the smooth coated pinscher” with reference to the German Pinscher and “the rough coated pinscher” what refer to the Schnauzer. That is the reason why those two seperate breeds are belonging in the same cluster. ( according to the cell report from 2015 ). They used the name Rattenfänger for both types, vermin killers and very useful as Farm/Stable Dogs. The name Pinscher is introduced later, after they first call them Rattler’s (Rattenfanger ). Type of desendants were a mix from the German Bibarand and the Tanners, they crossed later with the Black and Tan Terrier ( approx 1600 ).  H.G. Reichenbach mentioned in his book “Der Hund in seinen Haupt- und Nebenrassen” aus dem Jahr 1836: that also a small greyhound type of dog and the Dachshund were involved in the process of becoming the German Pinscher. If this is true we can say that through different sources and influences sighthound blood was introduced into the breed Dobermann. I will comeback later to this topic when I describe a little about the Manchester Terrier, there is something interesting to appoint. In an 1892 zoological dictionary there is a detailed entry on Pinschers. According to the author, the Pinscher or Pintscher are small to medium size Dogs, and though they are somewhat similar to English Terriers, they are not identical. He acknowledges that some claim the Greyhound or Dachshund as the ancestors of Pinschers, and others include the Pug or see the Bullenbeisser as the source.

As you can read through different opinions and sources to prove a 100 % accurate and educative reference in the matter of the german Pinscher origin isn’t easy. One thing can be said that the German Pinscher or type of Pinscher Hunde have a long history and it’s been mentioned in a article that the first publiced picture was from the 14th century in a copper etching called “The Crowning of Thorns”.

Around 1760, Daniel described in his “Field Sports,” “There are two sorts of terriers,” said he, “the one rough, short-legged, long-backed, very strong, and most commonly of a black or yellowish colour, mixed with white; the other is smooth – haired and beautifully formed, having a shorter body and more sprightly appearance, is generally of a reddish-brown colour, or black with tanned legs. Both these sorts are the determined foe of all the vermin kind, and in their encounters with the badger very frequently meet with severe treatment, which they sustain with great courage, and a thoroughbred, well-trained terrier, often proves more than a match for his opponent”. End quote.

 

Pinschers Racing
The smooth-haired pinscher appears alongside the rough-haired pinscher in an 1886 book by Jean Bungartz on dog racing in Germany. The book describes the planning and hosting of dog races along with the most appropriate breeds of dogs for racing. 

 

Etymology

What about the name Pinscher, Rattenpinscher, Pintscher or Pingerhund………..?

There are several theories on the etymology of the word Pinscher; that it derives from French “pincer”, meaning “to seize” and “to nip”,or “to bite” and “to grip” which are possibly related to their function of catching vermin on the farm, that it derives from English “pinch” referring to their clipped ears. I personal would think the word pinscher, if I refer it to some Dobermann traits, means to nip ( to pinsch ). Dobermann’s are great in it !

It is interesting to note that German authors sometimes used the term “Pinscher” to apply to the English terriers as well as their own domestic dogs. In a 1745 German-English dictionary, it appears there was no German equivalent for the word Terrier (as their were for many other types of dogs), only the phrase “a dog that is well trained on land, but does not go in the water”.

Interesting points in relation to their temperamant, appearance and traits..……….

In 1834, H.G. Reichenbach writes,“This nice dog breed has appeared only recently, seems to have sprung from England, and has taken the place of the Pug in Germany.” He describes a dog with a constantly cheerful temperament and therefore is always on the move and restless. “He loves the heat, and that is probably why he likes to stay in the horse stables… His propensity for hunting is as innate to him as it is to the Dachshund, kept in the house he tries to satisfy this at least by, in the evening, going out into the yard to chase rats, or going to the garden to ambush moles”.

 

Rattler
Don’t think we have to argue about their Vermin Killer instinct, it’s a trait we still can experience in our Dobermann. This drive is very valuable in relation to the Dobermann’s spirit.

 

In the book Cynographia Brittanica, published in 1800, “The Terrier is querulous, fretful and irascible, high-spirited and alert when brought into action; if he has not unsubdued perseverance like the Bull-dog, he has rapidity of attack, managed with art, and sustained with spirit; it is not what he will bear, but what he will inflict: his action protects himself, and his bite carries death to his opponent: he dashes into the hole of the fox, drives him from its recesses, or tears him to pieces in his strong hold; and he forces the reluctant stubborn badger into light. As his courage is great, so is his genius extensive: he will trace with the Fox-hound, hunt with the Beagle, find for the Greyhound, or beat with the Spaniel. This part I will share later again in relation to a other theme.

In an 1836 book by Kreutzer,“The Pinschers are black-brown, very nice dogs of medium height and came to us from England, and are already the favorite dog in Germany. They are slim built, with a cobby physique, and have their ears and tails cut while they are young. The temperament of this dog is always cheerful and upbeat”… “He is especially happy with the horses and therefore prefers to stay in the Stalls rather than in the room. They are particularly excellent in rat-catching.” 

If we go all of the way back to 1805, 14 years before the first description of the “English Pincher” in Germany, we find the following description of the Terrier:

“THIS little animal is a useful and almost constant attendant on a pack of Hounds. He possesses the sense of smelling in a much greater degree of perfection than most other Dogs: this faculty enables him to find out the game with great readiness; and his size permitting him to enter the holes of Foxes, & he soon forces them from their retreat, and obliges them to seek their safety in flight. The Terrier is the natural enemy of all those animals which are commonly, though improperly, called vermin; as Badgers, Polecats, Weasels, Rats, Mice, & It is possessed of great personal bravery, and not only attacks the Badger with great courage, but sustains the combat with determined fortitude, though it is sometimes very roughly handled by it.”

In 1853, J. M. Kreutzer writes “In recent times, the pinscher has become very popular”. He describes them as showing great proficiency and enjoyment in mouse catching. They are said to be very lively and skilled at digging, often quickly extracting a nest of baby mice from the ground. Their feet and muzzles are suitably formed for this “business”.

The German Pinscher is a terrier at heart in both its hunting performance and guarding outlook. It is a natural problem solver ! He was originally a stable dog living with and around horses; as such he has developed an affinity with this animal. His vermin killing abilities were legendary………..

I could go on and on to share of these kind of quotes and lines, we understand why Herr. Dobermann used Pinscher type of dogs into his breeding project. Their traits as for example sharpness, gameness, determination, loyal and brave character were very benificial for his needs. His Dobermann’sche Hunde were useful for different kind of jobs.

 

Genetic predisposition.

 

First Dobermann illustrated
Prinz Matzi and Alarch were both described as very aggressive and dangerous dogs. It isn’t strange to think this has to do with selection and so a heritage of their or at least one of the parents. Aggressiveness  ( in this context  a negative exposure ) in dogs has a high heritability and it isn’t a easy task to get rid of it when it is fixed in a bloodline. If your foundation stock has these kind of traits you will recognize it has a heritage in their future generations. After reading many books and articles it was very commom that the Dobermann breed was mentioned in many cases very unpredicted.  As well in beginning as later during time period.

 

About color…….

The heritage from the different ancestors is been a theme for many dicussions. Let’s take the heritage of color blue or harlequin. In relation to the Dobermann the color blue would sometimes describe as a heritage from the Great Dane or Weimaraner Dog. But I have read in may articles that blue is very common in the German Pinscher and Pinscher type of dogs. The color harlequin/arlequin would be a heritage from the Beauceron and there were Dobermann for WWI who had this color. It could be a possibility that this heritage was from the German Pinscher because this color was for WWI very common in the breed. 

Harlequin pinschers

A wooly undercoat was also a trait what is been seen in the German Pinscher and also in our Dobermann ( old type Dobermann ).

About the tail……….

There is a small mention of Pinschers in an 1864 piece of correspondence from the Frankfurt Zoo. “I recently read something strange, that one moment pinschers with tails are being born, the next minute puppies with no tails”. He goes on to write “This has occurred regularly for me for the last two years. A male pinscher that was tail-less from birth always had with a docked female pinscher two puppies with tails, two without. The last time, one with a tail, two without”.

Reading above share I don’t know exact if we can speak about natural bob-tail  ( tail-less) or that above dogs hadn’t a tail  at all ? The describtion could be different but I will not exclude the fact that the natural bob-tail we could and sometimes still see in our Dobermann is a heritage also from the German Pinscher. If this heritage was because of the cross with the Butcherdog or Thüringer Shepherd we will probably never know for sure. Philipp Gruenig described the bob-tail trait also in his book The Doberman Pinscher : History and Development of the breed.

About hunting techniques…….

This part has my interest and I will share two examples, one from own experience and one shared from a German friend. Let me say honestly that I don’t have a proof of those two examples has to to with what I describe as natural hunting technique (instinct) . Personaly I think it is, I shared my own story with the former breeder of my male as well with some other people who had also a Dobermann or were involved in dogs in different fields. Also the story of my German friend I have shared many times and both stories have never been taken seriously…….This doesn’t mean they have not a value or are not reading ( dogs language ) well it could be also a lack of knowledge ( from the part of others ) about dogs and behavior in general as in the matter of heritage of the breed ancestors. I can tell that I was very pleased to read some stories what was for me a confirmation.

I trully hope it gives some food for thought, probably you will be a little curious by now, there we go.

Hunting skills
Terrier and Fox, a portrait from  Daniel’s “Rural Sport’, 1801. 

 

From the book Cynographia Brittanica, published in 1800: “The Terrier is querulous, fretful and irascible, high-spirited and alert when brought into action; if he has not unsubdued perseverance like the Bull-dog, he has rapidity of attack, managed with art, and sustained with spirit; it is not what he will bear, but what he will inflict: his action protects himself, and his bite carries death to his opponent: he dashes into the hole of the fox, drives him from its recesses, or tears him to pieces in his strong hold; and he forces the reluctant stubborn badger into light. As his courage is great, so is his genius extensive: he will trace with the Fox-hound, hunt with the Beagle, find for the Greyhound, or beat with the Spaniel. Of wild cats, martens, polecats, weasels, and rats, he is the vigilant and determined enemy: he drives the otter from the rocky clefts on the banks of rivers, nor declines the combat in a new element.” 

In his 2008 novel Wolf Totem (by  author Jiang Rong ) he write the line………….it’s about driving a herd of gazelles into the water.
This is a instinctive skill from wolves although so far my opinion is.

Mark Derr shared about the line from Wolf Totem, in relation to coexistence between wolves and American Indian people, the following line.

Whether they developed those tactics on their own
and then taught them to humans or they observe, no one can say definitively.

A other line about hunting technique.

In Mark Derr’s book A Dog’s History of America, this line got my
personal attention.
In his 1878 book, In the Wilderness, Charles Dudley Warner graphically described a dog separating a doe from the her fawn and driving her into a lake where hunters in a boat overhauled her when she was exhausted and panic-stricken and slit her throat, leaving the fawn orphaned.

The following is my own experience: It’s about my second Dobermann many years ago he was a intact youngster, at that moment around 7-8 months. I desctibe it always if he herd some dogs into the water. He did this with a purpose  and determination, you could see this by reading his language. It was not learned behavior but a natural technique/skill.
I lived near the water from the Rhine and  you could make very nice walks through the sand and the dogs could be in the water to play. What my former boy showed had nothing to do with playing and I only have to watch the other dog ( panic in it’s eyes ) for a confirmation. You will understand that I firts was a little flabbergasted but act in a responsible way for all parties. First I thought it was a incident but after a second time he would try this again with a other dog I knew it wasn’t. My feeling later was that he saw also some dogs as a prey and was very aggressive and determined to lead them into the water. The reason for this we can only guess…….

A Story from what became a German friend

Almost 7 years ago when I owned my first Dobermann I came across a man who had also
owned several Dobermann in the past. Cat’s and a Dobermann are not a good match although most of the time. He shared a story about one of his Dobermann that had killed a cat by hunting him and hold him under water.

A penny for your thoughts……

 

The Manchester Terrier, the terrier who was introduced several times into the Dobermann………..

 

Old Black and Tan
In 1903, William Drury describes the original Black and Tan Terrier: “The old style of Black-and-tan Terrier was stronger than, but not so elegantly built as, his modern representative, and the stouter- limbed, broader-chested, thicker-headed, and coarser-coated dog that illustrates the original form from which our show dog has sprung is occasionally still to be met with. Dog shows have, no doubt, had much to do with transforming the rather cloddy Black-and-tan of former years into the graceful and refined animal now to be seen on the show bench.” 

 

While the German Pinscher definitely evolved along its own path in Germany, the Black and Tan Terrier in England eventually becoming the Manchester Terrier.

Daniel in his “Rural Sports” (1802) certainly describes a terrier of that colour common in his time, but this was a more stoutly built dog, made on the lines of a modern fox terrier and used for a similar purpose and as a gamekeeper’s assistant. Indeed, the common terrier of a hundred years ago was for the most part black and tan in colour, with white on his chest and on his feet. The late Rev. T. Pearce (“ Idstone”) tells us of the black and tan terrier which his family had owned nearly a century ago, and other writers follow in the same vein. These were bred for work and work only; the modern production is a purely fancy animal, whose “markings” are of more value than gameness, and his elegance of shape more than stoutness of constitution.” …” There is no doubt that between 1850 and 1860 the old-fashioned dog was crossed with some other variety of a lighter build, and this may have been a small dark-coloured Whippet.”

In 1903, Rawdon B. Lee writes about the evolution of the Black and Tan Terrier (Manchester) in England, and perhaps gives us an insight into what the old dogs that may have became the Smooth Pinscher were like. “I imagine that were one of our great-grandfathers to be shown a specimen of the modern black and tan terrier he would be unable to recognise it as the same variety of dog that, when he was a boy, ran about the stable yards, destroyed vermin, and was usually a household pet. The original fox terrier was a black and tan terrier; at any rate, many terriers used for the purpose of driving foxes from their holes were black and tan in colour, and from them must have sprung the “black and tan ” as he is seen to-day, crossed probably with some lighter built dog, maybe with a small greyhound.” 

Italian greyhound

It seems that the Black and Tan Terrier, what becoming later the Manchester Terrier, is been crossed with a small sighthound ( Italian Greyhound or Whippet ? ). So the influence from the sighthound into the Dobermann could come from two sides ? Not only from the purebred Greyhound Max through the main heritage from Stella into the Dobermann. Philipp Gruenig has described it in his book. It depends of course at the combination and so the line from the Manchester Terrier which been used for the cross. We also don’t know for sure if this cross ( with influence from the sighthound ) is been used as the last introduction into the Dobermann in 1914. This said it’s great to be informed or read about certain possibilities and influences.

In the matter of temperament influence through the introduction from the sighthound, Greyhound, and Manchester Terrier blood, can be controversial . The one will say the Greyhound influence wasn’t a good thing for the Dobermann temperament and the other will say it was the Manchester Terrier influence what has given a poor or to sharp temperament.

Italian Greyhound
The Italian Greyhound can be shy and timid. They are sensitive and most of the time reserved with strangers.

 

Characteristics from the Manchester Terrier…….

They are accelent vermin killers, very alert and active, wants to be around his family, high prey drive, love the warmth, very clean and proper as a cat, great observers in general, determinded and can be stubborn. Just some of what you can experience with a Manchester Terrier. 

All those traits, skills, drives etc. from what I would describe as a heritage from the Terrier blood is for me so recognizable in relation to my own Dobermann female. If you not aware of a breeds heritage and the influence of it, there is a possiblity you don’t understand your Dobermann language. That is what fascinate me about reading and learning about a breeds history. It all depends about your individual Dobermann bloodline and the selection of traits from the breeder, intrinsic motivation and if  you let your Dobermann be first a dog. It can give you more insight and you will or can experience indentical elements of their heritage of becoming the Dobermann. The insight can be very beneficial or needs a managing plan for a healthy and respectful relationship.

Everyday can be a learning curve………..

 

Manchester head study by Bert Cobb, 1931
Manchester Terrier head study by Bert Cobb, 1931.

 

I will end  this blog also with Apolda,  I’ll share a video. Some of you wil recognize a former Dobermann breeder !

 

Reference :

http://rhapsodygermanpinschers.com/history.html

http://www.wallenfels-pinscher.de/historie.html

http://www.masterkarn.com.au/article_dobe_vs_gp.html

https://chestofbooks.com/animals/dogs/Terriers-UK/The-Terriers-Part-2.html

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(17)30456-

 

 

Please share with me if  something isn’t accurate or not for general  public. It is no problem I will remove or update this blog. The only intention is to share information and a personal thought in relation to history.

 

 

Logo_DobermannKeeper

 

 

 

Dobermann as Coast Guards.

World War II U.S.C.G Coast-to-Coast !

These beach patrols were primarily security forces and had three basic functions:

1 To detect and observe enemy vessels operating in coastal waters and to transmit information on these craft to the appropriate Navy and Army commands;

2 To report attempts of landings by the enemy and to assist in preventing landings;

3  Prevent communication between persons on shore and the enemy at sea.

The patrols also functioned as a rescue agency and policed restricted areas of the coast. Just the rescue function alone more than justified the operation of the patrol.

 

Coast Guard
The Coast Guard, as a part of the Navy, was the logical choice to work along the beaches. With an already long proud tradition of beach patrols dating back to the days of the nineteenth century Life-Saving Service, the Coast Guard organized the beach patrol.

 

Dogs Patrol Start.

In 1942, the Coast Guard recognized that the use of dogs, with their keen sense of smell and their ability to be trained for guard duty, would help enhance the beach patrols.

The first dog beach patrols began at Brigantine Park, N.J., in August 1942. The dogs were so successful, that within a year, the animals and their handlers were on duty in all the districts, on both the east and west coasts.

Dog patrols were usually conducted at night and consisted of a dog and dog handler. The patrol length was about one mile. Where canine patrols were in effect, the two-man foot patrols were replaced, thus reducing personnel requirements.

The Coast Guard eventually received about 2,000 dogs for beach patrol duties. At first the coast guard men, known as sand pounders and coasties, received their training directly from the army at the QMC’s Front Royal Center.

U.S  Coast Guard War Dog Unit.

 

Above video is been shared with me by Diane Jessup from DanBar Ranch Dobermans. It’s unique footage and so great to watch our beloved breed during their Coast Guard training time. It’s a part of their history and valuable to share and to be aware of. 

The Coast Guard soon established three training centers along the east coast. Dogs and their handlers were schooled on the 300-acre estate of P.A.B. Widnener, at the Elkin Park Training Station in Pennsylvania. Others were trained at Hilton Head, S.C. and Curtis Bay, Maryland.

On-The-Job Training!
On the dark beach at night they (sic, K-9 dogs) can spot a stranger by his scent. They don’t bark, but will lead the sentry silently toward he intruder, even crawling on their bellies if necessary for better concealment.

“One dark night I hid behind a sand dune to test a sentry and see how keen his dog was,” said an Coast Guard officer, as we stood out on the beach. “He was a little late, having lingered over the coffee and sandwiches that are brought to the sentries at night.”

“The wind was blowing from me toward the dog, but at an angle, so at first he didn’t catch my scent. I thought both man and dog had fallen down on their job. But just then the dog did smel me and came for me like a flash.”

“I told the man that if his dog hadn’t done so well, he would have lost some leave for being late. He went out to the kennel later and kissed the dog!”

Even though the program was reduced 75 percent, many dogs and their handlers were placed on special guard duties.

The Coast Guard had ultimately became the largest procurer of dogs from the army, with a peak population of 3,649 dogs.

By the end of the war, 2,662 coast guard men had received training as handlers by both the army and within their own camps.

Most of the dogs were returned to Fort Robinson, Nebraska, and then processed into the army or demilitarized and returned to their civilian owners.

The Coast Guard also closed each of its dog training centers.

It’s a little share about this chapter during WWII. If you are interested to read more about the Dobermann as War Dog during WWII below there is a link to a other blog.

dobermann981601186.wordpress.com/2018/08/05/marine-war-dogs-of-ww-ii/

 

reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Coast_Guard

https://www.k9history.com/WWII-uscg-beach-patrols.htm